18 September 2020

Get the cloud you want






The new IBM Z single-frame and multi-frame systems can transform your application and data portfolio with innovative cloud native development, data privacy, security, and cyber resiliency – all delivered in a hybrid cloud environment.


SUSE, IBM Z and LinuxONE: Celebrating the First 20 Years

In 1999, as the digitized world approached the year 2000, all thoughts were on “Y2K,” and what it would mean for the millions of lines of code that ran the computers for business and government. Would switching the two-digit year from “99” to “00” cause massive systems failures and chaos? Would our ATMs stop working, and airplanes fall out of the sky? In the midst of this perceived crisis, hardly anybody was thinking about the future impact of porting Linux to the mainframe.

The new IBM z15 Part 1 - 4/15/20


Skip ahead 20 years, and many technological changes have fundamentally altered the ways we live, work and see the world. Camera phones have given everyone the power to document our times. The internet has gone from a “like to have” to an essential component of consumer-facing commerce, back-end operations, education, social services and even medicine. Far from being the “end of the world” for digital devices, the year 2000 marked the beginning of an unprecedented boom in innovation and collaboration – perhaps none more profound in the world of business IT than combining the power of the IBM mainframe with the possibilities of Linux.

The new IBM z15 Part 2 - 4/23/20

The concept of open source software was still in its infancy when Linux began making significant inroads into commercial data centers – assuming increasingly critical roles in business operations. Opportunities for innovation were wide open as SUSE introduced commercial Linux to the IBM s/390 mainframe – now IBM Z – in the fall of 2000. Since then, SUSE and IBM have continued to watch Linux grow and gain acceptance throughout the business world.

Today, more businesses choose SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for IBM Z and LinuxONE than any other Linux for running workloads on IBM mainframes. The reasons are self-evident. SLES is optimized for IBM mainframes, and businesses want to focus on serving their customers – not managing their IT. And the proven engineering excellence of the IBM mainframe, combined with the agility and business value of Linux, enable businesses to accelerate innovation to keep pace with constantly changing market dynamics.






Despite the tendency of some to dismiss mature technologies, neither Linux nor the mainframe could in any way be considered “outmoded” or “antique.” The issue isn’t age. It’s quality, reliability, security and an ongoing ability to innovate and adapt to change. As countless commoditization cycles within the IT industry have written lesser technologies into the history books, Linux on the mainframe is enabling businesses to write the next chapter in their story of digital transformation. Indeed, Gartner’s 2019 assessment that “open source is becoming the backbone for driving digital innovation” speaks both to the innovative capabilities of Linux and to the continued reliability and security of the IBM mainframe.

Introducing the new IBM z15 T02  

Many of the world’s exciting innovations in business IT are being developed and deployed via Linux on the mainframe. Traditional industries such as finance and retail are finding new ways to remain competitive using hybrid cloud and AI – running on Linux and the mainframe – to make the most of their data in service to their customers. While newer types of workloads to manage digital currencies, global scientific research and emerging industries continue to demand the highly available, reliable and secure computing provided by Linux on the mainframe.

The distinguishing features Linux on the mainframe will enable both to play essential roles in mission-critical business operations for many years to come. We’ve come a long way in our first 20 years, and have much to be proud of. But envisioning the possibilities of the next 20 years makes us even more excited about the future of Linux on IBM Z.

LinuxONE: Determining Your Own IT Strategy

Dogs are supposed to wag their tails, not the other way around. Yet, too many enterprises have found themselves in situations where their IT infrastructure dictates the way they run their business.

Introducing the new IBM z15 T02


Lest anyone forget, the purpose of IT is to enable and support business outcomes, not to determine or limit them. But how do enterprises get control of their IT when it’s already up and running, and comprises piece parts from a variety of vendors? How do enterprises migrate their mission-critical operations to a hybrid cloud environment so they can move quickly and manage growth?

With the introduction of LinuxONE five years ago, IBM answered those questions with secure, reliable and scalable architecture, complementing the capabilities of the underlying architecture in unique ways. Massive power, extreme virtualization, and open and disruptive technologies make the combination greater than the sum of its parts.

Unlike other Linux platforms, LinuxONE lets users scale up without disruption. Having this “cloud in a box” capability means enterprises can add database layers and new applications to their IT infrastructure without taking everything offline. They can change their tires and even upgrade their horsepower while staying in the race—critical capabilities in any industry with constantly changing demands.

The key is being able to define what’s valuable to an organization, versus what an IT platform will let it do. With its values determined, the enterprise is free to establish its own cloud roadmap, manage its own cloud services consumption, and position itself for innovation and market disruption.

LinuxONE represents the culmination of years of innovation and integration in optimizing open source workloads on a trusted architecture. Add to that the capabilities of Red Hat OpenShift, and you have a hybrid cloud infrastructure that:

  • Optimizes the value of existing IT infrastructure
  • Hosts mission-critical applications while protecting sensitive data
  • Maintains security and scalability in the public cloud
  • Enables “write once/run anywhere” application portability
  • Installs and upgrades without disrupting ongoing business processes

Enterprises with traditional workloads can capitalize on the elegance of managing and scaling their cloud-native system from a single control point that enables previously unheard-of agility in their digital reinvention. Businesses with emerging workloads— such as enterprises in the Confidential Computing space—can count on the secure service containers and hardware security models of LinuxONE to establish and build trust in their marketplace relationships. And all users can benefit from the systems’ containerization, encryption and virtualization that allow them to maintain control of their own security keys. In other words, the enterprise—not the IT infrastructure—is in charge.

As LinuxONE celebrates its fifth anniversary, it has emerged as a “lighthouse” platform of global collaboration to simplify IT management, even as tasks have become more complex. As a result, we stand on the verge of a period of dramatic change, in which AI running on hybrid cloud will enable breakthroughs in classical computing and its tremendous potential to improve countless aspects of our lives. For businesses and governments making this important journey, LinuxONE is an essential partner to progress.

IBM and Red Hat: Nearly two decades of Linux innovation across computing architectures

In the decades since its inception, Linux has become synonymous with collaboration, both at a technical and organizational standpoint. This community work, from independent contributors, end users and IT vendors, has helped Linux adapt and embrace change, rather than fight it. A powerful example of this collaboration was the launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 2.1 in 2002, heralding the march of Linux across the enterprise world. Today, Red Hat Enterprise is a bellwether for Linux in production systems, serving as the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform to power organizations across the world and across the open hybrid cloud.

All of this innovation and industry leadership wouldn’t have been possible without a strong partner ecosystem, including the close ties we’ve long had with IBM. IBM was one of the first major technology players to recognize the value in Linux, especially RHEL. As IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE celebrate 20 years of powering enterprise IT today, this benchmark provides further validation of the need for enterprise-grade Linux across architectures, especially as the requirements of modern businesses change dynamically.

One Linux platform, spanning the mainframe to the open hybrid cloud
For more than five years, Red Hat’s vision of IT’s future rests in the hybrid cloud, where operations and services don’t fully reside in a corporate datacenter or in a public cloud environment. While the open hybrid cloud provides a myriad of benefits, from greater control over resources to extended flexibility and scalability, it also delivers choice: choice of architecture, choice of cloud provider and choice of workload.

RHEL encompasses a vast selection of certified hardware configurations and environments, including IBM Z and LinuxONE - this ecosystem recently expanded to include IBM z15 and LinuxONE III single frame systems. Working with IBM as a long-time partner, we’ve optimized RHEL across nearly all computing architectures, from mainframes and Power systems to x86 and Arm processors. It’s this ability to deliver choice that makes RHEL an ideal backbone for the hybrid cloud.

Linux is just the beginning
Linux is crucial to the success of the hybrid cloud, but it’s just the first step. RHEL lays the foundation for organizations to extend their operations into new environments, like public cloud, or new technologies, like Kubernetes. Choice remains key throughout this evolution, as innovation is worth nothing if it cannot answer the specific and evolving needs of individual enterprises.

RHEL is the starting point for Red Hat’s open innovation, including Red Hat OpenShift. Again, thanks to our close collaboration with IBM, the value of RHEL, OpenShift and Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud technologies encompasses IBM Z and LinuxONE systems. This makes it easier for organizations to use their existing investments in IBM’s powerful, scalable mainframe technologies while still taking advantage of cloud-native technologies.

Supporting IT choice and supporting IT’s future
The open hybrid cloud isn’t a set of technologies delivered in a box - rather, it’s an organizational strategy that brings the power and flexibility of new infrastructure and emerging technologies to wherever the best footprint is for a given enteprise’s needs. IBM Z and LinuxONE represent a powerful architecture for organizations to build out modern, forward-looking datacenter implementations, while RHEL provides the common plane to unite these advanced systems with the next wave of open source innovations, including Red Hat OpenShift.

Twenty years of open source software for IBM Z and LinuxONE

It’s been 20 years since IBM first released Linux on IBM Z, so I thought it appropriate to mark the occasion by exploring the history, the details, and the large ecosystem of open source software that’s now available for the IBM Z and LinuxONE platforms.

IBM has deep roots in the open source community. We have been backing emerging communities from a very early stage — including the Linux Foundation, the Apache Software Foundation, and the Eclipse Foundation. This includes years of contributions to the development of open source code, licenses, advocating for open governance, and open standards in addition to being an active contributor to many projects.

As open source continues to gain momentum in the software world, we see growth reflected across different hardware and processor architectures. The processor architecture for IBM Z and LinuxONE is known as s390x.

If you’re new to these two hardware platforms, they are commonly known as mainframes. IBM Z has had a tremendous evolution with world-class, enterprise-grade features for performance, security, reliability, and scale. The latest version, IBM z15, can co-locate different operating systems including Linux, z/OS, z/VSE, and z/TPF. The LinuxONE III model has the same features as IBM Z, but was designed exclusively for the Linux operating system, including most commercial and open source Linux distributions.

When we talk about commonalities, there’s one that is not very well known related to mainframes — open source software. Did you know that open source software (OSS) for mainframes existed as far back as 1955? SHARE, a volunteer-run user group, was founded in 1955 to share technical information related to mainframe software. They created an open SHARE library with available source code, and undertook distributed development. It was not called “open source” back then, but we can consider that one of the early origins of open source.

Open source software, Linux, and IBM

The popularity of open source software originated in large part as a result of years of cultural evolution through sharing libraries across all programming languages. Innovating and sharing software with reusable functionality has become a common practice led by open source communities and some of the largest organizations in the world. Another factor is that all of the latest technologies are being developed in the open — AI, machine learning, blockchain, virtual reality, and autonomous cars, just to name a few.




As mentioned earlier, open source is not new to mainframes — another example is Linux, which has been used for more than 20 years. In 1999, IBM published a collection of patches and additions to the Linux kernel to facilitate the use of Linux in IBM Z. Then, in 2000, more features were added to the mainframes, including the Integrated Facility for Linux (IFL), which hosts Linux with or without hypervisors for virtual machines (VMs).

Over the last 20+ years, IBM has committed significant resources to Linux. In 2000, IBM announced a $1 billion investment to make Linux a key part of the company strategy, establishing IBM as a champion for contributions to the Linux kernel and subsystems.

One of IBM’s key contributions to Linux has always been enhancements that take advantage of the unique capabilities of the mainframe. Today, IBM Z and LinuxONE run a much-improved open source Linux that allows amazing technology for high I/O transactions, cryptographic capabilities, scalability, reliability, compression, and performance.

All commercial and open source Linux distributions are available for IBM Z and LinuxONE: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, Open SUSE, CentOS, Alpine, and ClefOS.

The use of Linux over the course of 20 years has opened the doors to a vast ecosystem of open source software for IBM Z and LinuxONE.

The open source software ecosystem for S390x
Today, in line with its commitment to Linux, IBM contributes to many open source projects. In fact, together with Red Hat, which is now part of IBM, it has the largest number of active open source contributors in the world — an amazing feat.

Because IBM is committed to the goal of continuing to develop the open source software ecosystem for IBM Z and LinuxONE, the company has teams of full-time developers that contribute upstream back to open source communities. In general terms, all you need is a different compiled Linux distribution for s390x; then, if you want to port exiting software, you will have to build or compile it again on IBM Z or LinuxONE.

Open source communities and IBM upstream developers address technical items specific to s390x, especially when related to existing open source software for x86 processors that need to be ported and validated on an IBM Z or LinuxONE (s390x).

Technical considerations for porting OSS to S390x
First, it’s important to note that most software recompiles or builds with minimal to no changes; x86-specific components will cause compilation or runtime errors. In those cases, code needs to be added to make those libraries or components work for s390x.

S390x uses big-endian memory allocation. The big-endian scheme stores the most significant byte (MSB) first, while the little-endian scheme available in ARM and x86 processors stores the least-significant byte (LSB) first. What this means is that if the software is doing low-level memory allocation in a little-endian scheme, the code needs to be adjusted to big-endian so the application can continue to work properly in the mainframe.

The same considerations apply to library dependencies (transitive libraries) in which functionality specific to other processor architectures needs to change to work on s390x.

Every tool, script, and piece of software is different, but for the most part, the previous technical considerations apply, and in many cases, no code changes are required — all you have to do is build or compile the software again.

Growing the open source ecosystem
There you have it! Coding and building OSS are basically the same on any platform. The use of Linux and re-use of open source technologies, together with commonly used open source development tools and languages, have helped to grow the ecosystem of OSS for IBM Z and LinuxONE. We have seen more interest in recent months, and we are looking forward to having more OSS (especially in the AI space) being available for s390x.

Open source on IBM z/OS is a topic for another blog post, but it too is seeing growth including Linux Foundation projects like Zowe.

Open source ecosystem - logos

We invite you to participate. We have a growing community, and there are resources available for you to try in the IBM LinuxONE Community Cloud as well as a variety of other resources listed in this blog post. Developers and enterprises are sure to enjoy the benefits of working in a familiar open source environment.


Explore and make use of the advanced capabilities of the IBM z15
 
More than any other platform, the z15 offers a high-value architecture that can give you the cloud you want with the privacy and security you need. From the hundreds of microprocessors to the Z software stack, the z15 is built to be open, secure, resilient, and flexible from the ground up.

The z15 is offered as a single air-cooled 19-inch frame called the z15 T02, or as a multi-frame (1 to 4 19-inch frames) called the z15 T01.

The IBM Redbooks team brought together experts from around the world to help you explore and realize the potential of the IBM z15. Let IBM Redbooks guide you through the opportunities that this new technology can bring to your business.

https://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks.nsf/pages/z15


The new IBM Z single-frame and multi-frame systems bring security, privacy and resiliency to your hybrid cloud infrastructure

WHY THE NEW IBM Z15 T02 MAINFRAME TECHNOLOGY MATTERS MORE THAN EVER

The New IBM z15 T02 Mainframe


Observations On IBM’s Announcement

As anticipated, IBM announced the follow-on to the z14 ZR1 server, the z15 model T02. This class of server from IBM is designed to deliver the scalability and granularity required for small and medium-sized enterprises across all industries. IBM architected this server by building off the enterprise-class chipset introduced in the Enterprise Class counterpart known as the z15 model T01. It is interesting to note, the 19” form factor found in the z15 T01 was first introduced in the prior small and medium-sized enterprise-class mainframe server – the ZR1.

If you have not kept up to speed on mainframe technology, things have changed dramatically. The image below highlights what IBM’s latest Mainframe family looks like. The number of racks in the T01 model is a function of the size of the client configuration. The T02 will always be a single rack system.

Lasting Technologies Innovate

Due to the recent changes in our world, it is comforting to know that the mainframe is the most secure, reliable, available and innovative platform, and it continues to support the backbone of our economy. It is amazing to see the IBM Z enhancements made over just the last decade, as highlighted below.

Mainframes have continued to see new innovations and technologies capabilities over the years. For example, you can see above how the number of cores and memory continues to increase with each server generation.



Network of Experts: Bodo Hoppe and IBM z15 – a developer perspective | IBM Client Center Boeblingen


For those platform nay-sayers that claim the “mainframe is dead,” why are the memory and core numbers increasing? The answer is simple; it is because clients are still dependent on this platform, and their workloads are continuing to grow and demand more resources.

What a great technology story! The first IBM mainframe was introduced in 1964. It just goes to show you that the mainframe is a lasting technology and that IBM and its partners will continue to innovate on the platform, while still preserving its core values

As anticipated, IBM announced the follow-on to the z14 ZR1 server, the z15 model T02. This class of server from IBM is designed to deliver the scalability and granularity required for small and medium-sized enterprises across all industries. IBM architected this server by building off the enterprise-class chipset introduced in the Enterprise Class counterpart known as the z15 model T01. It is interesting to note, the 19” form factor found in the z15 T01 was first introduced in the prior small and medium-sized enterprise-class mainframe server – the ZR1.

If you have not kept up to speed on mainframe technology, things have changed dramatically. The image below highlights what IBM’s latest Mainframe family looks like. The number of racks in the T01 model is a function of the size of the client configuration. The T02 will always be a single rack system.

Due to the recent changes in our world, it is comforting to know that the mainframe is the most secure, reliable, available and innovative platform, and it continues to support the backbone of our economy. It is amazing to see the IBM Z enhancements made over just the last decade, as highlighted below.

Mainframes have continued to see new innovations and technologies capabilities over the years. For example, you can see above how the number of cores and memory continues to increase with each server generation.

For those platform nay-sayers that claim the “mainframe is dead,” why are the memory and core numbers increasing? The answer is simple; it is because clients are still dependent on this platform, and their workloads are continuing to grow and demand more resources.

What a great technology story! The first IBM mainframe was introduced in 1964. It just goes to show you that the mainframe is a lasting technology and that IBM and its partners will continue to innovate on the platform, while still preserving its core values

Enterprise Modernization And The T02

During the uncertainty in our world right now, many states and their mainframe environments have made headlines.  Several states are scrambling to locate programming talent to scale their legacy mainframe applications which are written in Enterprise COBOL. These applications support the unemployment systems, which are seeing a dramatic spike in claim submissions.1  Having read these articles, there appear to be common themes – the organizations decided to no longer invest in the platform, complacency may have set in, or some organizations favored a workload refactor + re-engineering approach.  Organizations that embark on a transformation journey focus on the promise of reduced costs, improved customer experience and revenue growth. The challenge is none of those benefits are realized until the activity results in true Maintenance and Operation (M&O) of the refactored workload. That can happen, but it takes a concerted investment effort and time.

Interesting Features Of IBM Z15 T02

Turning our attention back to IBM’s announcement, this new server offers five hardware models and well over 250+ unique software capacity settings, providing a highly granular and scalable system. The base single-engine speed of 98 MIPS is found on the A01; the same full speed unit (Z01) climbs to 1761 MIPs, up from 1570 MIPs on the prior generation. The server clock speed held steady at 4.5 GHz, yet the average single-core performance increases 14% when compared to the ZR1. Also seeing increases are memory configurations and the number of cores available within a single system image for Linux-centric workloads. Docker Containers can be deployed natively on this system, and doing so would allow your microservices to access native z/OS services within the same LPAR. Talk about zero network latency!

The T02 server also includes key innovative features. One such feature is known as Compression Acceleration, and a second is Instant Recovery. Let’s briefly review both within the context of the T02.

Compression Acceleration

Compression Acceleration is made possible due to a new on-chip accelerator known as the Nest Acceleration Unit (NXU). DEFLATE is an industry-standard compression protocol. The T02 NXU leverages Gzip compression, which offers improved reliability over DEFLATE. Utilizing on-chip compression will provide higher compression ratios and operates in one of two modes: synchronous or asynchronous. Synchronous mode will go straight through to the on-chip accelerator. Asynchronous mode will require a corresponding priced feature on z/OS.



Instant Recovery
 
Did you know the mainframe system that you currently own embraces a three-pronged system availability strategy? IBM designs the mainframe with a three-pronged availability strategy.

Begin with a mindset that centers on keeping the system up and running.
Eliminate both unplanned outages as well as planned outages.
Architect the hardware and OS so that your applications remain available should an LPAR become unavailable for whatever reason, such as to apply maintenance. IBM instrumentation includes support for rolling IPLs and platform clustering technology.
To continue to improve the focus on system availability, another new feature, IBM System Recovery Boost, has been released.

According to IBM[i], System Recovery Boost is an innovative solution that diminishes the impact of downtime, planned or unplanned, so you can restore service and recover workloads substantially faster than on previous IBM Z generations with zero increase in IBM software MSU consumption or cost.

With System Recovery Boost, you can use your already-entitled Central Processors and zIIPs to unleash additional processing capacity on an LPAR-by-LPAR basis, providing a fixed-duration performance boost to reduce the length and mitigate the impact of downtime:
  • Faster shutdown
  • Faster GDPS automation actions
  • Faster restart & recovery
  • Faster elimination of workload backlog
Key features include:
  • Speed Boost: Enables general-purpose processors on sub-capacity machine models to run at full-capacity speed in the image(s) being boosted.
  • zIIP Boost: Provides additional capacity and parallelism by enabling general-purpose workloads to run on zIIP processors that are available to the image(s) being boosted.
Let’s dive further into this. How does the operating system know you are shutting down one of your LPARs and that a shutdown boost period of 30 minutes should start? It’s quite simple. At shutdown time, the operator has to explicitly activate the boost by starting the new started procedure IEASDBS (Shut Down Boost Start).

Upon re-IPL of that same LPAR, Boost would be “On by Default” for that image, offering up sixty minutes of boosted capacity to get the operating system and subsystems up. During the Boost period time, workloads will also continue processing at an accelerated pace.

For those familiar with this platform, you know that zIIPs traditionally only host DRDA, IPSec and IBM Db2 utility workloads, along with non-IBM Software solutions that have chosen to leverage the zIIP API. During System Recovery Boost, if you have at least one zIIP engine available to the LPAR, it can run both traditional zIIP-only workloads as well as General Purpose CP Workload. IBM dubbed this capability CP Blurring.  Just like Speed Boost, zIIP Boost will last thirty minutes on shutdown and sixty minutes on restart.

What runs on the zIIP during the boost period? The short answer – any program!2



On-Demand Webinar: Preparing Enterprise IT for the Next 50 Years of the Mainframe

Announcing IBM z15 Model T02, IBM LinuxONE III Model LT2 and IBM Secure Execution for Linux

Every day, clients of all sizes are examining their hybrid IT environments, looking for flexibility, responsiveness and ways to cut costs to fuel their digital transformations. To help address these needs, today IBM is making two announcements. The first is two new single-frame, air-cooled platforms– IBM z15 Model T02 and IBM LinuxONE III Model LT2–designed to build on the capabilities of z15. The second, is IBM Secure Execution for Linux, a new offering designed to help protect from internal and external threats across the hybrid cloud. The platforms and offering will become generally available on May 15, 2020.

Expanding privacy with IBM Secure Execution for Linux

According to the Ponemon Institute’s 2020 Cost of an Insider Breach Report[1] sponsored by IBM, insider threats are steadily increasing. From 2016 to 2019, the average number of incidents involving employee or contractor negligence has increased from 10.5 to 14.5–and the average number of credential theft incidents per company has tripled over the past three years, from 1.0 to 3.2.[2] IBM Secure Execution for Linux helps to mitigate these concerns by enabling clients to isolate large numbers of workloads with granularity and at scale, within a trusted execution environment available on all members of the z15 and LinuxONE III families.

Read the Ponemon Institute Report https://www.ibm.com/downloads/cas/LQZ4RONE

For clients with highly sensitive workloads such as cryptocurrency and blockchain services, keeping data secure is even more critical. That’s why IBM Secure Execution for Linux works by establishing secured enclaves that can scale to host these sensitive workloads and provide both enterprise-grade confidentiality and protection for sensitive and regulated data. For our clients, this is the latest step toward delivering a highly secure platform for mission-critical workloads.

For years, Vicom has worked with LinuxONE and Linux® on Z to solve clients’ business challenges as a reseller and integrator. On learning how IBM Secure Execution for Linux can help clients, Tom Amodio, President, Vicom Infinity said, “IBM’s Secure Execution, and the evolution of confidential computing on LinuxONE, give our clients the confidence they need to build and deploy secure hybrid clouds at scale.”

Simplifying your regulatory requirements for highly sensitive workloads
In addition to the growing risk of insider threats, our clients are also facing complexity around new compliance regulations such as GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act, demonstrating that workload isolation and separation of control are becoming even more important for companies of all sizes to ensure the integrity of each application and its data across platforms. IBM Secure Execution for Linux provides an alternative to air-gapped or separated dedicated hardware typically required for sensitive workloads.






TechU Talks Replay: Introducing IBM z15 Data Privacy Passports - 4/9/20




Learn more about IBM Storage offerings for IBM Z

Delivering cyber resiliency and flexible compute

Building on recent announcements around encrypting everywhere, cloud-native and IBM Z Instant Recovery capabilities, as well as support for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat Ansible Certified Content for IBM Z, these two new members of the IBM Z and LinuxONE families bring new cyber resiliency and flexible compute capabilities to clients including:

Enterprise Key Management Foundation–Web Edition provides centralized, secured management of keys for robust IBM z/OS® management.
Flexible compute: Increased core and memory density with 2 central processor complex drawer design provides increased physical capacity and an enhanced high availability option. Clients can have up to 3 I/O drawers and can now support up to 40 crypto processors.
Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4.3: The latest release, planned for general availability this month on IBM Z and LinuxONE.
Complementary IBM Storage enhancements
In addition, IBM also announced new updates to our IBM Storage offerings for IBM Z. The IBM DS8900F all-flash array and IBM TS7700 virtual tape library both now offer smaller footprint options. This week the TS7700 family announced a smaller footprint, with flexible configurations for businesses of all sizes and different needs that can be mounted in an industry-standard 19-inch rack.




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