• IBM Consulting

    DBA Consulting can help you with IBM BI and Web related work. Also IBM Linux is our portfolio.

  • Oracle Consulting

    For Oracle related consulting and Database work and support and Migration call DBA Consulting.

  • Novell/RedHat Consulting

    For all Novell Suse Linux and SAP on Suse Linux questions releated to OS and BI solutions. And offcourse also for the great RedHat products like RedHat Enterprise Server and JBoss middelware and BI on RedHat.

  • Microsoft Consulting

    For Microsoft Server 2012 onwards, Microsoft Client Windows 7 and higher, Microsoft Cloud Services (Azure,Office 365, etc.) related consulting services.

  • Citrix Consulting

    Citrix VDI in a box, Desktop Vertualizations and Citrix Netscaler security.

  • Web Development

    Web Development (Static Websites, CMS Websites (Drupal 7/8, WordPress, Joomla, Responsive Websites and Adaptive Websites).

09 January 2013

Dual-Booting with Linux and windows 8.


Dual-Booting with Linux and windows 8:


Virtualization is a popular option for accessing two different systems from the same hardware. You’ll learn more about VMware Workstation virtualization in the next article, but what about those old-school people who still want to dual-boot Linux rather than simply virtualize? Dual-booting is possible if you’re buying new hardware, and it’s very easy if you’re not. The issues with dual-booting on new hardware are related to a universal change that’s taking place in how system BIOS works.

Way back in the 1990s, Intel realized that the time-honored BIOS and firmware setup wasn’t particularly stable or secure. Over the years, we’ve seen the havoc that viruses and trojans have wreaked on unsecured BIOS-run systems.

Intel proposed to replace BIOS with a more sophisticated system called the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), which has finally reached adoption. UEFI is now managed by the Unified EFI Forum, rather than Intel. With Windows 8, original equipment manufacturers such as Dell, Asus, Acer, and others have combined with Microsoft and the Unified EFI Forum to make this new system a reality.

UEFI secure boot offers the following benefits:
  • Faster input and output for attached devices
  • Ability to boot disks larger than 2.1TB
  • A unified protocol for developing and loading device drivers
  • Better graphics support
  • Secure Boot

The Secure Boot feature, officially known as the UEFI 2.2 specification, requires the use of digital signatures to allow – or prevent – the loading of device drivers and operating systems. This precaution helps fight malware, such as trojans and viruses. If an operating system or process does not have the proper digital signature, it can be excluded from the boot process.
Microsoft has made sure that it supports Secure Boot, and many manufacturers have combined to enable this feature. Supporters of UEFI like the additional capabilities and security it provides. However, others are skeptical of UEFI because restricting access to the BIOS tends to restrict user choice and block innovation.

If you purchase a new UEFI-enabled system, any new operating system you install will need to supply a digital signature, or Secure Boot (if enabled) will not allow it to load.
There’s no single answer about installing Linux on a Windows 8 system, because you have to consider two issues: the hardware and firmware (e.g., your new Asus system with UEFI) and the operating system (Windows 8). So, here are the two major scenarios to consider.
If you have updated an old PC to Windows 8 and it has an incomplete version of UEFI installed or uses standard BIOS, you can dual-boot any version of Linux to your heart’s content. There are no limitations or issues, other than the typical “Updating to Windows 8 erased the GRUB implementation”.

On the other hand, if you want to install Linux on a UEFI-enabled Windows 8 computer, you have the following choices:

1) Use a version of Linux that uses a signed key that Secure Boot recognizes. Red Hat, Fedora, and Linux Mint all have digital signatures that UEFI will recognize. Many individuals in the Linux community feel that it isn’t proper for open source systems to buckle to pressure from Microsoft and the original equipment manufacturers in this way. For many others, though, getting a Linux system up and running in a dual-boot environment is more important.

2) If you don’t want to have the operating system choice pushed on you, you might be able to deactivate the Secure Boot option in your firmware. Although you can’t disable UEFI altogether (because it’s a BIOS replacement), you can, on some systems, tell UEFI to disable Secure Boot features. Doing so will reduce your boot security, but it will allow other operating systems to boot.

3) Obtain a key from the Linux distribution you want to use and add the key yourself using the UEFI-supplied screens at boot time.
(source: Admin Magazine)




And this is how the Linux Foundation has a resolution for the problem:

In a nutshell, the Linux Foundation will obtain a Microsoft Key and sign a small pre-bootloader which will, in turn, chain load (without any form of signature check) a predesignated boot loader which will, in turn, boot Linux (or any other operating system). The pre-bootloader will employ a “present user” test to ensure that it cannot be used as a vector for any type of UEFI malware to target secure systems. This pre-bootloader can be used either to boot a CD/DVD installer or LiveCD distribution or even boot an installed operating system in secure mode for any distribution that chooses to use it.  The process of obtaining a Microsoft signature will take a while, but once it is complete, the pre-bootloader will be placed on the Linux Foundation website for anyone to download and make use of.

linuxfoundation.org

For more information:

Drs. Albert Spijkers
DBA Consulting
web:            www.dbaconsulting.nl


email:          albertspijkers@dbaconsulting.nl
                     info@dbaconsulting.nl



DBA Consulting on Facebook


02 January 2013

Oracle OBIEE 11.1.5 extended with Oracle Endeca

Oracle Endeca Information Discovery is a data discovery platform that guides people to better decisions on diverse and changing data. It is based on a patented hybrid search-analytical database, and gives IT a centralized platform to rapidly deploy interactive analytic applications,


and keep pace with changing business requirements while maintaining information governance.

  •     Explore vast amounts of information from a variety of unstructured and structured data sources in one easy-to-use application
  •     Determine cross-channel behaviors with seasonality, location
  •     Monitor performance of digital merchandising strategies
  •     Drill in to customer sentiment via user generated content
  •     Ingest data from data warehouses, Web analytics, product management systems, social data, and more


The Sales Overview page provides a dashboard to view and explore overall sales figures.



To support an interactive user experience, the database must be able to process and respond to rapidfire queries in sub-second intervals. It should also be able to accommodate new data and changes to existing data with minimal rework. Oracle Endeca Server does this by providing:

  • Multicore query parallelism – increase scale and reduce latency with additional cores.
  • In-memory caching of frequently accessed working column segments and query results.
  • Per-attribute column storage: record order for value lookup, value order for range filters.
  • Full range of type-specific compression techniques including: Prefix, String Coding, Run Length, Delta, Variable Length Numeric Coding, etc.

Figure below demonstrates how the Oracle Endeca Server achieves these performance characteristics
through an intelligent use of CPU, memory and storage resources.


Scalability and performance characteristics of Oracle Endeca Server

Flexible Data Model

Oracle Endeca Server employs a unique flexible data model that reduces the need for up-front
modeling, enables the integration of diverse and changing data, and supports the broad exploration and analysis needs of business users.

Oracle Endeca Server's data model is based on the concept of "records". Roughly analogous to data
warehouse facts, each record consists of an arbitrary collection of attributes made up of key/value
pairs. These attributes can have a single value, multiple values, or a hierarchy of values based on an
external taxonomy definition. Values may be text of any length, numeric, date/time, geospatial, or
Boolean.

Importantly, Oracle Endeca Server does not employ an overarching schema for data. Instead, every
record has its own schema. This enables the rapid integration of any type of data, whether structured
or unstructured, from inside or beyond the confines of the enterprise data warehouse, without the efforts associated with traditional data modeling.



Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.



Overview video:

Endeca overview (before take over last year by Oracle):



Oracle Endeca overview:




Adding a Datasource:





Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.


Drs. Albert Spijkers
DBA Consulting
web: http://www.dbaconsulting.nl
blog: http://drsalbertspijkers.blogspot.com/
profile: http://nl.linkedin.com/pub/drs-albert-spijkers/13/b4a/7a8
Facebook : http://www.facebook.com/pages/DBA-Consulting/101640233252655
email: info@dbaconsulting.nl